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Clarified examines our obsession with looking young — dating back hundreds of years — and what you can actually start doing now

Is ‘anti-aging’ possible? Dermatologist explains how to beat the heat, skin care myths

Clarified examines our obsession with looking young — dating back hundreds of years — and what you can actually start doing now

For centuries. People have searched far and wide for the fountain of youth in hopes of reversing aging. Now we have elixirs marketed as anti aging products promising to smooth skin and reduce the appearance of wrinkles. It’s *** booming industry in 2020 the value for anti aging products across the globe was estimated at $165 billion by 2028. Experts estimate its value will explode to 284 billion. So why is the anti-aging industry such *** success? And are these products capable of all? They claim Alexander the great who died in 323. BCE may have been looking for *** river that healed aging Spanish explorer, Juan Ponce de Leon was rumored to have been searching for the fountain of Youth in Florida in the 15 hundreds. According to the Journals of Gerontology. During the Renaissance in the 16th century, the idea of pro longevity came from the belief that individuals could control the length and quality of their time on earth. Along with the search for the mythical well, eccentric creams, facials and rituals were invented such as sliced meat masks during the Elizabethan era. Now, techniques that sound just as archaic like mucus slugging and low invasive surgeries like micro needling and vampire plasma have taken ST why has the quest for aging backwards? Stood the test of time. It’s always been expected that *** woman would continue to look, especially to her partner the way she looked when they met, they figured out it is in the workplace. Once you start to look like you, you’re aging, then you start to experience the things that the elderly people experience of like, you know, kind of kind of being shopped to the side, not getting that promotion. They’re much more forgiving of the men that they are women. We’re not allowed to look just any old way anti-aging to me means that you are trying to do whatever you can to stave off the ravages of time in her 20 years as *** board certified dermatologist, Doctor Rosemary Ingle has seen an uptick in interest in anti aging. We’re talking about it *** lot more than we ever were. People were very private before now, people are so much more open, everything is in magazines, everything is online, it’s on Tik Tok, we’re just talking and so the stigma is being removed. Interest especially skyrocketed during the pandemic when we were shut down in 2020 people had nothing else to do but go online and research whatever they were curious about. So having to be on zoom all the time, right? You were super critical. She’s also noticed her clientele is getting younger, but I am seeing more people in their twenties asking for preventative Botox people in their and even some older teenagers asking to have their lips in hands because they know it’s *** thing they can get it done. So I think it’s an awareness that’s been built up because there’s so much available on social media and they’re seeing instructional videos and they’re seeing people who have had the treatments done, talk about it. She’s also found more clients of color are asking for anti aging treatments. But the the marketing that was done early on only showed people who look exactly like each other. *** white woman or *** white man. That was it. So everybody else thought that it was only for that group. Consumers should also look out for marketing gimmicks that are almost too good to be true. And you can’t say that *** cream is gonna eliminate *** wrinkle, it will reduce the appearance of it, it will soften it smoothen it, things like that. So read your packaging and if it sounds like it’s *** little too much Bragg going on, it’s probably because it’s not real. There’s also *** lot of myths flying around about anti-aging and skin care, first of all, sunscreen. But the biggest myth is that if your skin is darker, you don’t need it. That’s the oldest one in the book, you know, that is so not true. Another myth around sunscreens is, you know, the SPF number. If someone tells me they’re wearing *** SPF six, I just say, don’t bother, you know, you want *** minimum of *** SPF 30. The myth that if you were born with good jeans that you don’t have to do anything to take care of your skin because you’re gonna just age like your mom or your dad did. Aside from the myths, Doctor Elton has tips on which ingredients work best. So I’m *** big believer in fruit acid. I love what they do for all skin types bringing out radiant and I love peptide. Peptides are great for, you know, helping with pumping your collagen, you know, definitely anti-aging and the vitamin C is great as an antioxidant. So I think of it as your armor that you put on before you go out each day, it’s gonna help to combat some of what the environment and some of what, you know, sunlight and all of that does to your skin. My trifecta is wash your face, put an antioxidant on and then put *** sunscreen on.

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Is ‘anti-aging’ possible? Dermatologist explains how to beat the heat, skin care myths

Clarified examines our obsession with looking young — dating back hundreds of years — and what you can actually start doing now

For centuries, people have been searching for the “fountain of youth”– a mythical spring filled with water granting eternal youth. Nowadays, elixirs labeled as “anti-aging” products – creams and serums claiming to reduce wrinkles and other signs of aging – have become a hot commodity. In 2020, the value for anti-aging products across the globe was estimated at $165 billion. By 2028, experts estimate its value will explode to $284 billion. Myth-busting skin care“With a product, you can only do so much, you’re probably not going to remove a wrinkle with a wrinkle cream. You can reduce the appearance of a wrinkle,” Dr. Ingleton said. “None of us are supposed to be saying things like we can remove wrinkles with products. That’s what people want to see,” Dr. Ingleton said. “But the truth is, the FDA controls what you can say.”According to the FDA website, the FDA is concerned about skin care products overpromising their potential by making claims that would classify them as drugs. Federal law defines a cosmetic as a “product designed for cleansing, beautifying, promoting attractiveness, or altering the appearance.” If a product is marketed to make lines and wrinkles less noticeable by moisturizing the skin, the FDA labels it as a cosmetic. Cosmetics must be safe according to product labeling but the law does not require cosmetic products to be approved by the FDA before they go on the market. Drugs, however, must have FDA approval for safety and effectiveness before they go on the market. Recommended by a dermatologist Since the start of her career, Dr. Ingleton stands by products with fruit acids to bring out radiance.“Whether they’re alpha hydroxy acids or beta hydroxy acids, I love what they do for all skin types,” Dr. Ingleton said.She also recommends products containing peptides, as they are “great for helping with pumping your collagen.”Vitamin C is also another recommended ingredient that can protect the skin. “Vitamin C is great as an antioxidant,” Dr. Ingleton said. “So I think of it as your armor that you put on before you go out each day. That’s going to help combat some of what the environment and sunlight does to your skin.”

For centuries, people have been searching for the “fountain of youth”– a mythical spring filled with water granting eternal youth.

Nowadays, elixirs labeled as “anti-aging” products – creams and serums claiming to reduce wrinkles and other signs of aging – have become a hot commodity.

In 2020, the value for anti-aging products across the globe was estimated at $165 billion. By 2028, experts estimate its value will explode to $284 billion.

Myth-busting skin care

“With a product, you can only do so much, you’re probably not going to remove a wrinkle with a wrinkle cream. You can reduce the appearance of a wrinkle,” Dr. Ingleton said.

“None of us are supposed to be saying things like we can remove wrinkles with products. That’s what people want to see,” Dr. Ingleton said. “But the truth is, the FDA controls what you can say.”

According to the FDA website, the FDA is concerned about skin care products overpromising their potential by making claims that would classify them as drugs.

Federal law defines a cosmetic as a “product designed for cleansing, beautifying, promoting attractiveness, or altering the appearance.”

If a product is marketed to make lines and wrinkles less noticeable by moisturizing the skin, the FDA labels it as a cosmetic. Cosmetics must be safe according to product labeling but the law does not require cosmetic products to be approved by the FDA before they go on the market.

Drugs, however, must have FDA approval for safety and effectiveness before they go on the market.

Recommended by a dermatologist

Since the start of her career, Dr. Ingleton stands by products with fruit acids to bring out radiance.

“Whether they’re alpha hydroxy acids or beta hydroxy acids, I love what they do for all skin types,” Dr. Ingleton said.

She also recommends products containing peptides, as they are “great for helping with pumping your collagen.”

Vitamin C is also another recommended ingredient that can protect the skin.

“Vitamin C is great as an antioxidant,” Dr. Ingleton said. “So I think of it as your armor that you put on before you go out each day. That’s going to help combat some of what the environment and sunlight does to your skin.”